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Environment & Poverty discussed at Post 2015 Development Agenda meeting

Efforts to develop post 2015 development agenda are highlighted.
Mar 25, 2013

Current efforts to develop what is known as the 'post-2015 development agenda' include almost 100 national consultations in UN member states, as well as 11 thematic consultations on issues such as food security, access to water, and poverty reduction.

 

San Jose (Costa Rica), 19 March 2013 - Costa Rica is the latest country to host the ongoing global conversation on priorities for the world's future development path.

Over 100 participants are gathering in the capital San Jose to discuss how the environment can be best integrated into global framework that is set to succeed the UN's Millennium Development Goals in 2015.

Those addressing the opening of the meeting included Minister of Foreign Affairs of Costa Rica, Carlos Roverssi, Special Envoy of the French President for the Protection of the Planet, Nicolas Hulot, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Helen Clark, and Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Achim Steiner.

Current efforts to develop what is known as the 'post-2015 development agenda' include almost 100 national consultations in UN member states, as well as 11 thematic consultations on issues such as food security, access to water, and poverty reduction.

"It is obvious that a single way to global sustainable development does not exist. Therefore, global guidelines and frameworks must show certain flexibility to allow each country, region or community to plan and execute their development activities according to their own local-specific characteristics, needs and expectations," said Minister of Foreign Affairs of Costa Rica, Carlos Roverssi, in his opening speech.

"However, it is also necessary to provide a set of global guiding principles, based upon international agreements that will help those communities engage in a sustainable development deeply rooted on continuous improvement and conservation of their stock of natural capital," he added.

"The imperative now is to move from a discourse focused on trade-offs between growth, poverty, and environment, to one which looks at how to advance the three strands of sustainable development together," said UNDP Administrator Helen Clark.

"The world will not be able to sustain economic and social progress if the environment is wrecked," she added.

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